Key Stakeholder

Key Stakeholder Publics
1.) Local NGOs
2.) Salisbury University Faculty & Staff
3.) Salisbury University Students

Local NGOs: We contacted The Polaris Project in Washington D.C., The Protection Project at Johns Hopkins University, and Turn Around in Baltimore, MD.

Demographic & Psychographic Profile: Local NGOs will strongly support the awareness of sex trafficking in the United States and the initiative to stop it. Demographically, they will be made up of staff members who represent Maryland and whose target audience is residents of Maryland. Females make up the majority of Maryland residents with 51.6%. 88.2% of Maryland residents have earned a high school diploma or higher.

Motivating self-interests: Local NGOs associated with the issue of human trafficking or sex trafficking are already interested in spreading awareness of the issue and taking action against it. Their self-interests include furthering their cause as well as spreading the name of their organization to earn trust and establish credibility.

Status of current relationship with the organization and issue: NGOs working to spread awareness of sex trafficking are already greatly invested in the issue. We want to work in conjunction with them without repeating or hindering their efforts in any way. They have no current relationship with our group but may be able to establish a friendly issue based relationship through email.

Third party influentials and other opinion leaders: A third party influence that may hinder us reaching this target audience is the amount of work that the organizations do. Contacting someone quickly and establishing a workable relationship will be hard based on our time constraints. Other opinion leaders could include other organizations that would like to work to spread awareness of the issue and Maryland NGOs will clearly choose to invest time in a relationship with them to further their cause than our group.

What objectives each public will help you accomplish: Local NGOs will help us accomplish the objective, “To educate the target publics about sex trafficking of minors in the United States within two weeks.” They may not necessarily reach out to Salisbury University on a grand scale and plan a campaign to educate Salisbury University students, but they can provide facts and material such as pamphlets or buttons that will assist our group in spreading awareness.

Salisbury University Faculty & Staff:

Demographic & Psychographic Profile: The number of male and female faculty members at Salisbury University is around the same with female being slightly higher. Of tenured professors, 93% have a terminal degree and 89% hold a Ph.D. Of non-tenured full-time professors, 34% have a terminal degree and 22% hold a Ph.D.

Motivating self-interests: Faculty and staff have a job to do at Salisbury University. They will most likely assist us if they can but we will not be a top priority. First they will finish or work on grading or other SU related projects and initiatives. Self-motivation includes positive evaluations from students and a likeable reputation among other faculty as well as students.

Status of current relationship with the organization and issue: In this scenario, our group is the organization and we hold a strong relationship with faculty and staff because we are students of the university. We are able to directly reach them by email or office hours and most feel an obligation to assist students because they are educators. They may or may not have knowledge of the issue of human trafficking unless they are involved in International Affairs or Conflict Resolution.

Third party influentials and other opinion leaders: Third party influential include end of semester projects and final exams week. Faculty may learn of our issue but not understand the importance because there is so much work and grading to be done before the end of the semester. They may not have time to invest in learning of sex trafficking and taking action against it.

What objectives each public will help you accomplish: Faculty and staff will help us accomplish the objective, “To educate the target publics about sex trafficking of minors in the United States within two weeks.” Faculty and staff members have offices that we can post event flyers on and we can ask if they are willing to announce our events or project to their classes. They are a great resource for reaching students in whatever way we can.

Salisbury University Students:

Demographic & Psychographic Profile: Each year around 51.1% of SU students are 20 years old and younger. 37.9% are ages 21-24. And 10% are 25 and older.

Motivating self-interests: Students want entertainment. They attend events where they will have fun and can bring their friends. They are also motivated by free things.

Status of current relationship with the organization and issue: As students of Salisbury University, we have a great relationship with other students because they are our friends and classmates. We can easily contact them to spread awareness of our issue. Most are unaware of the issue of human trafficking in the United States.

Third party influentials and other opinion leaders: Thankfully, no one is speaking out FOR human trafficking so there shouldn’t be any debate among our organization and other opinion leaders. However, other student organizations are also focused on social issues and promoting events to spread awareness and student may attend those third party events instead of ours.

What objectives each public will help you accomplish: Students will help us accomplish the objective, “Spread awareness of the sex trafficking of minors in the United States to 200 students at Salisbury University within two weeks.” We will be targeting them with information about sex trafficking hoping to make as many students aware of the issue as possible to accomplish our objective.

(http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/24000.html)
(http://www.salisbury.edu/iara/FactBook2001-02/FB02UG.pdf)
(http://www.salisbury.edu/iara/FactBook2005-06/PDF/A-1.0.pdf)

Power: Listed in order from who has the most power to who has the least, the key stakeholders are Maryland NGOs, Salisbury University faculty and staff, and Salisbury University students. According to Mitchell, power is defined as “a relationship among social actors in which one social actors, A, can get another social actor, B, to do something that B would not have otherwise done.” Maryland NGOs have already gathered connections and contacts working to spread awareness of the issue. They have experience with what to do and where to do it. Salisbury University faculty and staff have the access to resources that can quickly spread awareness of the social issue campus-wide and to specific groups of students. Salisbury University students can support the cause and organize basic events but do not have the power of the other two publics.

Legitimacy: Listed in order of who has the most legitimacy to who has the least, the key stakeholders are local NGOs, Salisbury University faculty and staff, and Salisbury University students. According to Mitchell, legitimacy is defined as “a generalized perception or assumption that the actions of an entity are desirable, proper, or appropriate within some socially constructed system of norms, values, beliefs, definitions.” Local NGOs already have established credibility working on behalf of the social issue. The continued employment of SU faculty and staff relies upon members acting in a way that students and other faculty members deem trustworthy and appropriate. They are assumed to be honorable and helpful. SU students again fall below the two target publics because students are younger and not held to as high of a standard. They often disregard basic societal norms such as deadlines.

Urgency: Listed in order of who has the most urgency to who has the least, the key stakeholders are local NGOs, Salisbury University faculty and staff, and Salisbury University students. According to Mitchell, urgency is defined as “the degree to which stakeholder claims call for immediate attention.” The sole purpose of NGOs is to spread awareness of the social issue. The issue is extremely urgent to them and the only thing on which they focus. SU faculty and staff may call for immediate action faster than SU students because they are more educated and more likely to be aware of or understand the importance of the issue. SU students will be the least likely to see it as urgent.

Messages:

MD NGOs-

–          Primary: A younger generation needs to recognize the signs of sex trafficking. Let’s encourage them to fight and stop it from happening so close to home.

–          Secondary: Almost 300,000 American children are at risk for trafficking into the sex industry, according to U.S. Department of State statistics.

SU Faculty & Staff-

–          Primary: Sex trafficking is not another country’s problem, it is ours. We must educate ourselves and students on how it happens and learn to recognize the signs of it.

–          Secondary: When some people hear about sex trafficking in America they usually think of Asian and Eastern European women being brought into the states, but it’s actually 10 times more likely for an American girl to be trafficked inside the U.S.

SU Students-

–          Primary: Just because you can’t see it, does that mean it isn’t real? U.S. sex trafficking is a growing problem and we must educate ourselves on how it happens and learn to recognize the signs of it.

–          Secondary: About 14,500 to 17,500 girls from other countries are smuggled into the U.S. and exploited in sexual slavery.

Primary Message: Just because you can’t see it, does that mean it isn’t real? U.S. sex trafficking is a growing problem and we must educate ourselves on how it happens and learn to recognize the signs of it.

Secondary Message: In 2001 the United States State Department estimated that 50,000 to 100,000 women and girls are trafficked each year in the United States.

Slogan: Stolen people, stolen dreams.

Tagline: You only get one life. What if someone stole it from you?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: